Online Associate’s Degree in General Studies

60
Credit Hours
1
Avg. Completion
Years

Class Type

100% online, 8-week courses

Transfer Credits

Transfer in up to 45 credits

Accreditation

WSCUC

Associate Of Arts In General Studies Curriculum (AA)

AA in General Studies includes a total of 45 credits of GE courses and an additional five elective courses.

I. General Education (45 credits)
II. Electives (15 credits)

AREA A Communication (6-9 credits)

Course Description

Concepts of communication. Includes audience analysis, selection of topic, reasoning, mapping, material organization, visual aids, public speaking, verbal and non-verbal cues.

Credits

3

Course Description

Expressing ideas and conveying information in writing. Includes reasoning, factual support, clarity of purpose, organization, and language. Instruction and practice in reading and writing of expository and argumentative essays.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course focuses on improving students writing ability in various rhetorical modes, including description, narration, persuasion, definition, classification, comparison, causation, and process analysis. During the term, we will read examples of effective writing, discuss composition techniques and strategies, analyze and critique texts, and explore ways to put concepts and theories into practice through specific written assignments and Threaded Discussions.

Credits

3

AREA B Critical Thinking (3-6 credits)

Course Description

This is an introductory course in philosophy to satisfy the General Education requirement. Topics include the various traditions of philosophical thought, such as concepts of knowledge, reality, mind-body duality, existence of God, free will, and morality. Special topics include philosophers from Classical Era to 21st Century.

Credits

3

Course Description

Basic concepts of logic. Includes deductive and inductive reasoning, techniques of argumentation, analysis and assessment, evaluation of evidence, language, definition, and fallacies.

Credits

3

Course Description

Learn basic concepts of probability and statistical inference, focusing on an intuitive approach to understanding concepts and methodologies. Get an introduction to statistical and critical thinking, including descriptive statistics, probability, sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing and regression.

Credits

3

AREA C Mathematics (3-6 credits)

Course Description

Algebraic concepts and methods. Includes real numbers, graphs, linear and quadratic equations, systems of equation, polynomials, sinusoidal equations, theory of functions

Credits

3

Course Description

Topics include sets, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integral and applications. Interesting real life situations included.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course will review of Functions and Graphs, Applications of Integrals, and conclude with Infinite Sequences and Series. By the time you’re done, you’ll have studied how to use derivatives and integrals to solve a variety of problems and understand the connections and relationships that are fundamental to the theories of calculus.

Credits

3

AREA D Physical & Biological Sciences (3 -12 credits)

Course Description

This course is a general education course for students interested in the chemistry of everyday life. Includes determining the composition of foods and drugs, measurements, unit conversions, scientific notation, chemical representations, mole concept, structure of atoms and molecules.

Credits

3

Course Description

Introduction to basic biological concepts including biochemistry and macromolecules, the structure and function of cells, basic genetic principles, DNA replication, transcription and translation.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course examines nutritional concepts and scientific findings. Emphasis is placed on macro and micronutrients as methods of assessing nutrient intake in the well client. Additional topics include digestive processes, food additives, safety and sanitation as well as factors that influence nutrient intake. Fundamentals of normal nutrition, carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and their roles in human metabolism as well as nutrition and the life cycle are presented and explored.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course discusses unifying principles of elastic, sound, light and matter waves. Models of nature. Successes and failures of wave and particle models and their synthesis. The course meets the lower division General Education requirement in Natural Sciences.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course introduces the learner to the structure and function of the human body with particular emphasis on mechanisms of homeostasis. This course focuses on chemical, cellular, and tissue levels of organization, the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, central and peripheral nervous systems, organs of sense and concludes with the endocrine system. Laboratory experiences are obtained through the use of the Virtual Dissector, digital human program.

Credits

3

Course Description

The learner continues the journey through the structure and function of the human body with particular emphasis on mechanisms of homeostasis. This course focuses on normal structure and function of bodily systems, including cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, hematological and reproductive systems. Concepts of acid/base, fluid and electrolyte balance as well as basic genetics are included.

Credits

3

Course Description

Introduction to the biology of major groups of microorganism including their role in infectious diseases, their role in nature and their relationship to humankind.

Credits

3

AREA E Arts and Humanities (3-6 credits)

Course Description

This course provides an in-depth approach to issues of ethical, legal, and social responsibility impacts on decision making in the managerial and multidisciplinary environment. Emphasis on case studies will stimulate critical thinking and collaborative group discussions, which will address various current issues/topics for the 21st century.

Credits

3

Course Description

Analysis and interpretation of art. Art culture and society. Emphasis on style, form, and meaning. A survey of works and artists across the visual and performing arts.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course introduces students to both technical and conceptual elements of digital photography. Students will learn the fundamentals of a digital camera and image editing. This course will utilize technology in producing and manipulating photographs. Projects will apply the photographic components of exposure, composition, depth of field, and lighting. Students will develop the conceptual skills of looking, interpretation, and critique. Students will learn to communicate through photographic visual language, understanding and exhibiting how images produce meaning through medium and form. This course will also investigate historical and contemporary photography in order to examine how these photographic skills are practiced.

Credits

3

Course Description

A comparative study of some of the basic patterns of religion and/or a focus on one specific religion. The course will focus upon such themes as religious experience, myths of creation, stories of religious founders and heroes, the origin and resolution of human suffering, and the structure and meaning of religious community and ritual. Source material for these themes will be taken from the literary and artistic resources of the religious traditions of Judaism.

Credits

3

AREA F Social Sciences (9-12 credits)

Course Description

This course is an exploration of business in the 21st century that extends beyond the mindset of profit making as the sole purpose of business. Students explore how innovation in the marketplace generate organizational growth (economic and employment), while simultaneously contributing to the overall good of society. Topics include how society impacts business and how business impacts society, shared values, business for profit and non-for-profit businesses. Partnerships with the public, community involvement, ethical considerations such as decision making based on the good of organization and society, corporate social responsibility, ethics in business (business and government).

Credits

3

Course Description

A survey of the principles and basic concepts to enable students to understand of human behavior. Includes history and development of basic psychological theories.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course provides a sociological perspective, culture, socialization, social organization and stratification, deviant behavior and the study of the family.

Credits

3

Course Description

Introductory course on problems of scarcity and the allocation of limited resources among competing uses.

Credits

3

Course Description

Introduction to domestic and international factors affecting national income, inflation, and unemployment. The role of money and taxes, and government policy. Principles of economic analysis, economic institutions, and issues of public policy. Emphasis on production, allocation of resources, and distribution of income will be discussed.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course provides an overview and analysis of major health problems affecting the life of the individual, the family, and the community at large. Students will explore evaluation, planning, and implementation of approaches to meeting personal and societal health needs.

Credits

3

AREA G Cultural Studies (3-6 credits)

Course Description

In this course students will research the relationships between human societies and cultural adaptation and learn about social and cross-cultural behavior, language, customs, and social organizations.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course in anthropology and world culture introduces students to the fundamentals of human social and cultural adaptation. Course topics include social organization, language, types of non-literate and traditional societies, economics, religion, and art.

Credits

3

Course Description

Focus is on the influence of culture on illness, health, and rehabilitation. The relationship that culture plays in the health and wellness of both individuals and the community in which they live will be explored.

Credits

3

AREA H History (3-6 credits)

Course Description

Political and social development of the United States, with emphasis on colonial period, the Constitution, and American institutions, up to the Civil War.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course surveys the political, economic, and socio-cultural history of western civilization, mainly focusing on Europe and North America, from the seventeenth century to the present. Topics covered include the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, Age of Revolutions, industrialization and imperialism, the world wars, the Cold War, and decolonization.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course surveys the history of the Jews throughout the world from c. 300 C.E. to the present. The first half will examine interactions between Jews and Christian and Muslim cultures, the evolution of Jewish social organization, and the development of Judaism and Jewish thought up to approximately 1700. The second half will examine how modernity generated radically new varieties of Jewish religious and political life but also transformed traditional anti-Judaism into a virulent anti-Semitism.

Credits

3

AREA I Information Literacy (3 credits)

Course Description

Introduction to computer and Internet technologies for school research and writing. Provides a overview of data, electronic information and files and methods of organizing information. Includes strategies for using a variety of electronic resources emphasizing technological skills and critical thinking abilities as well as understanding the changing nature of information resources, computer and Internet ethics and security.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course is a computer literacy course designed to familiarize the learner with a variety of computer tools and computer concepts with emphasis on utilizing basic operating and software programs. The course provides an introduction to the use of computers, common software programs and peripherals. Students are instructed in a variety of areas to include the use of software applications in word processors, spreadsheets, databases, presentations, and the Internet.

Credits

3

Elective Courses (Please choose 5 elective courses) (15 credits)

Course Description

This course focuses on ways of critiquing media messages, inquiry into media messages, skills for becoming critical media consumer; students will learn how to analyze and evaluate different forms of media such as television, internet websites, newspapers, radio, magazines, video games, and films.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course deals with studying of selected musical traditions from around the world; it places emphasis on how music functions as part of the daily life in particular societies, familiarity with other cultures, values, and traditions, and gaining a better aesthetic appreciation of music from diverse societies and cultures. It explores the different ways music is shaped by the cultural settings in which it is performed, the impact of globalization, the music ideas that are common to all cultures, and the role music plays in the life of different societies.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course provides an overview of the military as a profession. Students explore both ethics and values in the military. Additional topics include principles of military leadership, the Law of War, counterinsurgency, and Civil-Military Relations.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course is an introduction and overview of the system of criminal justice in the United States today; it explores the historical development from current to future trends of criminal justice; sources, philosophies, and role of law in society; it examines the definition of law, the enforcement of law, strategies of policing, prosecution, adjudication, sentencing and corrections; it also explores the differences among civil, criminal and social justice.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course introduces the learner to the tools needed to be active participants in today’s global culture of digital literacy; it provides the learner with the technology skills to create digital products such as spreadsheets, presentations, and podcasts; analytical skills to understand, organize, and analyze numeric and graphic data in a global society.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course considers the nature of justice in philosophical, historical, and legal terms regarding racial justice, political representation, economic justice, gender and justice, the rights of cultural minorities, and crime and punishment. It examines major formulations of the relationship between law and culture in the sociological literature; it also examines the global sociological perspective on the development and consequences of laws and the courts in world culture and the structure and functions of the United Nations.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course surveys World History from the birth of civilization to the present. It examines the political, economic and cultural development of societies and explores how the interactions between peoples of different societies around the globe have impacted world history.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course is an overview of the Human Resource functions to learn the process for effective human resource management; it focuses on the fundamental Federal and State laws that affect human resources administration in every business from large to small; it also examine employee relations issues such as compensation, performance management, and discipline.

Credits

3

WSCUC Accreditation

Touro University Worldwide is accredited by the WASC Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC). Touro College Los Angeles (Lander Campus) is a division of Touro University Worldwide.

For more information on WSCUC, visit www.wascsenior.org or write WSCUC at 985 Atlantic Ave., Suite 100, Alameda, CA 94501.