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Online Associate of Arts in General Studies with Accounting Concentration

The Touro University Worldwide AA with a concentration in Accounting is designed as the first step along an Accountants’ career path and provides the fundamental skillsets students need to succeed.

AREA A Communication (6-9 credits)

Course Description

Concepts of communication. Includes audience analysis, selection of topic, reasoning, mapping, material organization, visual aids, public speaking, verbal and non-verbal cues.

Credits

3

Course Description

Expressing ideas and conveying information in writing. Includes reasoning, factual support, clarity of purpose, organization, and language. Instruction and practice in reading and writing of expository and argumentative essays.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course focuses on improving students writing ability in various rhetorical modes, including description, narration, persuasion, definition, classification, comparison, causation, and process analysis. During the term, we will read examples of effective writing, discuss composition techniques and strategies, analyze and critique texts, and explore ways to put concepts and theories into practice through specific written assignments and Threaded Discussions.

Credits

3

AREA B Critical Thinking (3-6 credits)

Course Description

This is an introductory course in philosophy to satisfy the General Education requirement. Topics include the various traditions of philosophical thought, such as concepts of knowledge, reality, mind-body duality, existence of God, free will, and morality. Special topics include philosophers from Classical Era to 21st Century.

Credits

3

Course Description

Basic concepts of logic. Includes deductive and inductive reasoning, techniques of argumentation, analysis and assessment, evaluation of evidence, language, definition, and fallacies.

Credits

3

Course Description

Learn basic concepts of probability and statistical inference, focusing on an intuitive approach to understanding concepts and methodologies. Get an introduction to statistical and critical thinking, including descriptive statistics, probability, sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing and regression.

Credits

3

AREA C Mathematics (3-6 credits)

Course Description

Algebraic concepts and methods. Includes real numbers, graphs, linear and quadratic equations, systems of equation, polynomials, sinusoidal equations, theory of functions

Credits

3

Course Description

This course covers general concepts of functions, including limits and continuity. It covers various rules for the computation of derivatives and integrals, such as the sum, product, and quotient formulas, as well as the chain rule. It also covers applying these concepts to the determination of maxima, minima, optimizations, and rate-related topics. The determination of the area of shapes through integration is also covered. Topics learned are applicable to various real world settings.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course will review of Functions and Graphs, Applications of Integrals, and conclude with Infinite Sequences and Series. By the time you’re done, you’ll have studied how to use derivatives and integrals to solve a variety of problems and understand the connections and relationships that are fundamental to the theories of calculus.

Credits

3

AREA D Physical & Biological Sciences (3 -12 credits)

Course Description

This course is a general education course for students interested in the chemistry of everyday life. Includes determining the composition of foods and drugs, measurements, unit conversions, scientific notation, chemical representations, mole concept, structure of atoms and molecules.

Credits

3

Course Description

Introduction to basic biological concepts including biochemistry and macromolecules, the structure and function of cells, basic genetic principles, DNA replication, transcription and translation.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course examines nutritional concepts and scientific findings. Emphasis is placed on macro and micronutrients as methods of assessing nutrient intake in the well client. Additional topics include digestive processes, food additives, safety and sanitation as well as factors that influence nutrient intake. Fundamentals of normal nutrition, carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and their roles in human metabolism as well as nutrition and the life cycle are presented and explored.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course discusses unifying principles of elastic, sound, light and matter waves. Models of nature. Successes and failures of wave and particle models and their synthesis. The course meets the lower division General Education requirement in Natural Sciences.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course introduces the learner to the structure and function of the human body with particular emphasis on mechanisms of homeostasis. This course focuses on chemical, cellular, and tissue levels of organization, the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, central and peripheral nervous systems, organs of sense and concludes with the endocrine system. Laboratory experiences are obtained through the use of the Virtual Dissector, digital human program.

Credits

3

Course Description

The learner continues the journey through the structure and function of the human body with particular emphasis on mechanisms of homeostasis. This course focuses on normal structure and function of bodily systems, including cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, hematological and reproductive systems. Concepts of acid/base, fluid and electrolyte balance as well as basic genetics are included.

Credits

3

Course Description

Introduction to the biology of major groups of microorganism including their role in infectious diseases, their role in nature and their relationship to humankind.

Credits

3

AREA E Arts and Humanities (3-6 credits)

Course Description

This course provides an in-depth approach to issues of ethical, legal, and social responsibility impacts on decision making in the managerial and multidisciplinary environment. Emphasis on case studies will stimulate critical thinking and collaborative group discussions, which will address various current issues/topics for the 21st century.

Credits

3

Course Description

Analysis and interpretation of art. Art culture and society. Emphasis on style, form, and meaning. A survey of works and artists across the visual and performing arts.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course introduces students to both technical and conceptual elements of digital photography. Students will learn the fundamentals of a digital camera and image editing. This course will utilize technology in producing and manipulating photographs. Projects will apply the photographic components of exposure, composition, depth of field, and lighting. Students will develop the conceptual skills of looking, interpretation, and critique. Students will learn to communicate through photographic visual language, understanding and exhibiting how images produce meaning through medium and form. This course will also investigate historical and contemporary photography in order to examine how these photographic skills are practiced.

Credits

3

Course Description

A comparative study of some of the basic patterns of religion and/or a focus on one specific religion. The course will focus upon such themes as religious experience, myths of creation, stories of religious founders and heroes, the origin and resolution of human suffering, and the structure and meaning of religious community and ritual. Source material for these themes will be taken from the literary and artistic resources of the religious traditions of Judaism.

Credits

3

AREA F Social Sciences (9-12 credits)

Course Description

This course is an exploration of business in the 21st century that extends beyond the mindset of profit making as the sole purpose of business. Students explore how innovation in the marketplace generate organizational growth (economic and employment), while simultaneously contributing to the overall good of society. Topics include how society impacts business and how business impacts society, shared values, business for profit and non-for-profit businesses. Partnerships with the public, community involvement, ethical considerations such as decision making based on the good of organization and society, corporate social responsibility, ethics in business (business and government).

Credits

3

Course Description

A survey of the principles and basic concepts to enable students to understand of human behavior. Includes history and development of basic psychological theories.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course provides a sociological perspective, culture, socialization, social organization and stratification, deviant behavior and the study of the family.

Credits

3

Course Description

Introductory course on problems of scarcity and the allocation of limited resources among competing uses.

Credits

3

Course Description

Introduction to domestic and international factors affecting national income, inflation, and unemployment. The role of money and taxes, and government policy. Principles of economic analysis, economic institutions, and issues of public policy. Emphasis on production, allocation of resources, and distribution of income will be discussed.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course provides an overview and analysis of major health problems affecting the life of the individual, the family, and the community at large. Students will explore evaluation, planning, and implementation of approaches to meeting personal and societal health needs.

Credits

3

AREA G Cultural Studies (3-6 credits)

Course Description

In this course students will research the relationships between human societies and cultural adaptation and learn about social and cross-cultural behavior, language, customs, and social organizations.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course in anthropology and world culture introduces students to the fundamentals of human social and cultural adaptation. Course topics include social organization, language, types of non-literate and traditional societies, economics, religion, and art.

Credits

3

Course Description

Focus is on the influence of culture on illness, health, and rehabilitation. The relationship that culture plays in the health and wellness of both individuals and the community in which they live will be explored.

Credits

3

AREA H History (3-6 credits)

Course Description

Political and social development of the United States, with emphasis on colonial period, the Constitution, and American institutions, up to the Civil War.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course surveys the political, economic, and socio-cultural history of western civilization, mainly focusing on Europe and North America, from the seventeenth century to the present. Topics covered include the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, Age of Revolutions, industrialization and imperialism, the world wars, the Cold War, and decolonization.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course surveys the history of the Jews throughout the world from c. 300 C.E. to the present. The first half will examine interactions between Jews and Christian and Muslim cultures, the evolution of Jewish social organization, and the development of Judaism and Jewish thought up to approximately 1700. The second half will examine how modernity generated radically new varieties of Jewish religious and political life but also transformed traditional anti-Judaism into a virulent anti-Semitism.

Credits

3

AREA I Information Literacy (3 credits)

Course Description

Introduction to computer and Internet technologies for school research and writing. Provides a overview of data, electronic information and files and methods of organizing information. Includes strategies for using a variety of electronic resources emphasizing technological skills and critical thinking abilities as well as understanding the changing nature of information resources, computer and Internet ethics and security.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course is a computer literacy course designed to familiarize the learner with a variety of computer tools and computer concepts with emphasis on utilizing basic operating and software programs. The course provides an introduction to the use of computers, common software programs and peripherals. Students are instructed in a variety of areas to include the use of software applications in word processors, spreadsheets, databases, presentations, and the Internet.

Credits

3

Concentration Courses (Please choose 5 concentration courses) (15 credits)

Course Description

This course is designed for students to develop an understanding of financial accounting fundamentals for prospective users of financial statements, such as investors, creditors, employees, and other stakeholders. Students will be introduced to the accounting cycle and will learn how to properly journal, document and post financial transactions.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course will show how personal ethics transfer into handling accounting ethical issues in the business world. It will help students to make proper ethical decisions by defining the nature of what accounting ethics and identifying the questions that need to be asked in everyday business practices.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course covers fundamental skills and basic knowledge in the area of business payroll. Focuses on payroll and personnel record keeping. Includes calculation of gross pay using various methods, Social Security and Medicare taxes, federal and state income taxes, and federal and state unemployment taxes.

Credits

3

Course Description

In this course, students will identify key accounting processes within a computerized environment. Students will develop an understanding of the key controls necessary to maintain an adequate computerized accounting environment, such as the accounts payable function, order entry and shipment, inventory tracking, billing environment, cash-handling, and payroll processing.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course analyzes United States tax laws and policies for individuals, corporations, and partnerships. Students will gain an understanding of the history of the United States tax systems and differentiate the differences of required taxes among entities as well as the inclusion and exclusion of income and expense items in tax calculations.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course studies accounting concepts and reporting techniques applied to management decision making. Students will analyze cost accounting concepts and analyze the behavior of costs, budgeting, differential analysis, and responsibility accounting. Students will learn how to apply financial statement analysis techniques to further understand the relationship between management decision making versus actual results.

Credits

3

Course Description

In this course, students will build on the foundations established in the Principles of Accounting I course. Students will develop knowledge in key elements of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), such as cash, temporary investments, receivables, inventories, long-term investments, and capital assets. Students will also learn how to prepare a set of financial statements (the income statement, the statement of retained earnings, and the balance sheet).

Credits

3

Program Requirements

In order to complete the degree in Associate of Arts in General Studies, the student has to complete a total of 60 credits

  • General Education (45 credits)
  • Concentration Courses (15 credits)
  • Portfolio

The time it will take to complete the associate degree online can vary. The duration of the program depends on several factors, including the number of credits accepted for transfer and whether or not students take time off between courses.

Students who enroll full time (12 credits per semester for three semesters each academic year) can complete the degree in 5 sessions. Students who enroll part-time (six credits per semester for three semesters each academic year) will complete the program in 10 sessions.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the Associate of Arts in General Studies may be achieved by completion of the following requirements:

  1. High school diploma or GED equivalent
  2. High school cumulative GPA of 2.0 (if not a transfer student)
  3. Pass admissions test in English and Math/placement test

    1. Successful completion of a transferable course in ENG 130 with a grade of C or higher, waives admissions test in English.
    2. Successful completion of a transferable course to MAT 106 or higher, grade of C or higher waives admissions test in Math.