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Online Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

Our program provides opportunities for professional and personal development and builds an academic foundation for continued education into one of our graduate-level psychology concentrations or clinical Master’s degree.

Core Requirements (39 Semester Credits)

Course Description

The principles of psychology course provide a broad overview of topics in the field of psychology. The course serves as a foundational course for the BA in Psychology program. Topics included in the course contribute to the BA in Psychology program for courses such as research methodology, biological bases of human behavior, cognitive psychology, etc.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course will consist of an examination of psychology as a science and a profession. It explores the development of modern psychology, the role of science in that development, and career paths related to scientific psychology.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course examines and discusses the value of empirical evidence, tolerance of ambiguity, ethical behaviors (including the APA Ethics Code), and other values that underpin psychology as a science and profession.

Credits

3

Course Description

Community psychology examines the relationships of individuals with their surrounding communities along with the ways society has an impact upon an individual and community functioning. This area of psychology seeks to understand people in their social worlds and uses this understanding to enhance people’s well-being in their environments. Some of the tools used by community psychologists include social service, mental health services, social action, psycho-education, and action research. Furthermore, the efforts of community psychologists often focus on preventing mental disorders and promoting community mental health and well-being.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to psychological research techniques and methodology. Topics to be covered include the logic of research, the issues that must be considered in deciding how to study various psychological phenomena, and ways to address the difficulties posed by the limitations of specific studies. Ways for assessing threats to the internal and external validity of studies will be examined. These issues will be illustrated through reference to the examples of research on various topics in psychology.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course uses the life-span developmental approach to developmental psychology, including prenatal life development. Gain perspective on biological, physical, cognitive, emotional, linguistic, socio-cultural and spiritual changes across the life span, from prenatal and birth through the major stages of childhood, adolescence and adulthood. The course examines fundamental theories, perspectives and critical thoughts about historical and current arguments in the field.

Credits

3

Course Description

Social Psychology is the study of the relationship between the individual and society. This course covers the theory and method in social psychology, impression formation, social cognition, attitude change, social influence, group processes, and applications of social psychology.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course surveys classic and current theories of personality that represent several of the major perspectives in psychology (e.g., psychoanalytic, biological, developmental, behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, socio-cultural), highlighting the contributions of each theory to personality description, assessment, research, therapy, and application.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course deals with examination of the experimental investigation of complex cognitive processes, including the storage and retrieval of information, concept formation, reasoning, problem-solving and decision making.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course provides a comprehensive study of the various forms of mental illness and maladjustment.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course provides an introduction to the science and practice of clinical and counseling psychology from integrated perspectives. History, major theories, and scientific underpinnings are covered, as well as current developments in practice and research. Major topics include research design, theoretical models, diagnostic and assessment methods, psychotherapeutic interventions, treatment effectiveness, specialization, and training.

Credits

3

Course Description

Designed to introduce the principles that underlie the development, use and interpretation of psychological assessment tools. Topics include: test construction, survey development, scaling, norming, assessment interpretation issues and psychological assessment applications in industrial, vocational, clinical and research settings. Additionally, psychological assessment will be discussed in terms of social, legal and ethical concerns.

Credits

3

Course Description

The Capstone course provides an opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills developed in the program, which demonstrates mastery of the program learning outcomes through application of psychological theories and principles.

Credits

3

Elective Requirements (24 Semester Credits)

Course Description

Focus on the study and application of psychological principles, theories, and methodologies related to teaching and learning. Emphasis on developmental, learning, and motivational theories. Current trends also covered.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course addresses the relationship between our underlying physiological systems and behavior. The topics investigated include neural communication, the anatomy of the nervous system, and the biological bases of sleep, reproductive behavior, stress, learning and memory, and mental disorders.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course deals with the application of research and psychological principles to human behavior in the workplace. Course topics will include the psychological aspects of employment selection and assessment, performance appraisal, employee and work team development, reorganization and downsizing, work stress, employee violence, work/family conflict, and the changing nature of the workplace.

Credits

3

Course Description

Through the use of theoretical and empirical approaches, this course focuses on a biopsychological approach to health psychology including psychological and physiological aspects of U.S. and global health issues. Students will develop knowledge of the psychological aspects of a variety of health topics. Potential topics include body management systems, disease prevention, chronic illnesses, pain, stress and coping, substance abuse, nutrition, and alternative models of health behavior change.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course will examine approaches to parenting and development of parenting skills; communication systems study of children and families with various cultural patterns and lifestyles. Topics examined will include: different family structures of communication patterns within the family system context; theoretical implications of techniques used when working with family systems; the importance of cultural awareness when working with families.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course is designed to help students understand alcohol and drug addiction from a biological, psychological, and social approach. Students will learn about the different causes of addiction, with the goal of understanding that addiction is both a disease and a behavioral phenomenon. Students will learn about the most common drugs of addiction as well as a variety of treatments for drug addiction. The societal effects of addiction will also be examined, with a focus on the impact on mental health centers, hospitals and prison systems.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course examines the interaction of psychology and the legal system including the topics of insanity, eyewitness testimony, police interrogation, lie detection, offender rehabilitation, and criminal profiling, and various key experiments in the field of forensic psychology.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course will examine the comparative study of cultural effects on human psychology including such topics as: psychological diversity and the links between cultural norms and behavior; the ways in which particular human activities are influenced by social and cultural forces; and the comparative method used to establish psychological concepts, principles, and hypotheses. Through discussions and readings students can expect to develop a broader, global perception of contemporary psychology.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course deals with the nature and experience of adult development from the end of adolescence until the end of life. As a psychology course, emphasis will be placed on psychological issues related to personal/ individual issues and differences in aging, as well as on information that has been collected using the scientific method. Topics covered include: kinds of problems that confront people during adulthood; successful and unsuccessful outcomes for adult life; the types of psychological problems that can occur during the aging process; and the role does death play in our lives as we age.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course covers the theory, construction, and use of some of the more popular assessment instruments used in the field of psychology. The course will also review the interpretation, scoring, reliability and validity of the instruments, the ethics of testing and assessment, and the professions which use these techniques, including clinical and counseling psychology, forensics, neuropsychology, and employment screening.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course discusses positive psychology throughout the field of psychology and how positive psychology seeks to increase positive emotions, happiness and satisfaction with life instead of focusing on treating disease and reducing negative emotions. The course reviews and summarizes the most notable contributions of positive psychology over the last decade.

Credits

3

Course Description

Psychology of a new language acquisition. Comparison and evaluation of various types of language educational models including Structured English Immersion (SEI), English as a Second Language (ESL) and bilingual. Includes SEI, ESL, and bilingual strategies.

Credits

3

Secondary Education Concentration (12 Semester Credits)

Course Description

Psychology of a new language acquisition. Comparison and evaluation of various types of language educational models including Structured English Immersion (SEI), English as a Second Language (ESL) and bilingual. Includes SEI, ESL, and bilingual strategies.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course will provide skills necessary for working effectively with adolescents with mental health needs or health related problems requiring mental health services. The course will also address how to develop and evaluate treatment, and intervention programs for these populations. Special topics include practical, legal, and ethical issues for working with adolescents in educational, mental health, and medical settings.

Credits

3

Course Description

Political and social development of the United States, with emphasis on colonial period, the Constitution, and American institutions, up to the Civil War.

Credits

3

Course Description

Focus on the study and application of psychological principles, theories, and methodologies related to teaching and learning. Emphasis on developmental, learning, and motivational theories. Current trends also covered.

Credits

3

Course Description

Exploration of the general theories of reading, cognitive models of reading, how we read, draw on ideas from linguistics, cognitive psychology, writing systems, the region of the brain involved in reading, factors associated with reading difficulties, how brain damage impact reading, reading research, relationship between language and intelligence, and the complicated human language processing system.

Credits

3

Elementary Education Concentration (12 Semester Credits)

Course Description

Political and social development of the United States, with emphasis on colonial period, the Constitution, and American institutions, up to the Civil War.

Credits

3

Course Description

Psychology of a new language acquisition. Comparison and evaluation of various types of language educational models including Structured English Immersion (SEI), English as a Second Language (ESL) and bilingual. Includes SEI, ESL, and bilingual strategies.

Credits

3

Course Description

Focus on the study and application of psychological principles, theories, and methodologies related to teaching and learning. Emphasis on developmental, learning, and motivational theories. Current trends also covered.

Credits

3

Course Description

Exploration of the general theories of reading, cognitive models of reading, how we read, draw on ideas from linguistics, cognitive psychology, writing systems, the region of the brain involved in reading, factors associated with reading difficulties, how brain damage impact reading, reading research, relationship between language and intelligence, and the complicated human language processing system.

Credits

3

Special Education Concentration (12 Semester Credits)

Course Description

Psychology of a new language acquisition. Comparison and evaluation of various types of language educational models including Structured English Immersion (SEI), English as a Second Language (ESL) and bilingual. Includes SEI, ESL, and bilingual strategies.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course is designed to provide a foundation for understanding learning disabilities both in and out of the school setting. Students will become acquainted with historical trends associated with the development of the field and will review related federal and state legislation. Research related to general characteristics of learning disabilities, cognitive processing patterns, and the academic and social performance of the learning disabled is examined. Students explore the education of students with learning disabilities based on various theoretical models.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course is designed to provide a basic background in, as well as practical opportunities with, general methods and materials appropriate for working with students with disabilities at the elementary through secondary level. Emphasis will be placed on approaches to learning and teaching, specific teaching and learning strategies, and the role of the special educator in the school community. Students explore the selection, adaptation, and development of instructional materials across curriculum areas, student needs and school environments.

Credits

3

Course Description

Political and social development of the United States, with emphasis on colonial period, the Constitution, and American institutions, up to the Civil War.

Credits

3

Course Description

Focus on the study and application of psychological principles, theories, and methodologies related to teaching and learning. Emphasis on developmental, learning, and motivational theories. Current trends also covered.

Credits

3

Course Description

Exploration of the general theories of reading, cognitive models of reading, how we read, draw on ideas from linguistics, cognitive psychology, writing systems, the region of the brain involved in reading, factors associated with reading difficulties, how brain damage impact reading, reading research, relationship between language and intelligence, and the complicated human language processing system.

Credits

3

Industrial/Organization Psychology Concentration (12 Semester Credits)

Course Description

This course introduces the student to issues and strategies related to effective communication and interviewing skills. The course will identify professional communication skills that facilitate effective relationships with clients, and other professionals and will highlight skills necessary for interacting effectively as members of teams for interviewing and communicating with clients from multicultural backgrounds.

Credits

3

Course Description

Examine the foundations of applied social psychology; explore how social psychological theory and research inform the analysis of social issues and social problems, such as the applications of social psychology to education, business and industry, environmental problems, interpersonal and intergroup relations, health, communication, judicial and political systems.

Credits

3

Course Description

Explore different theories associated with attitude change, persuasion, and resistance processes; implicit versus explicit attitudes; cognitive versus affective influences; dissonance and attitudinal ambivalence; selective exposure and biased processing; increased understanding of how individuals form and maintains change. Examine the structure and function of attitudes, the relationship between attitudes and behavior, the cognitive and motivational background of attitude change, models of persuasion, interpersonal influence, the influence of behavior on attitudes and ensuing behavior.

Credits

3

Course Description

Explore theories relating to culture in industrial organizational psychology, impact of culture, ethnicity, and race on human behavior within the framework of industrial and organizational psychological theory and research; understanding of fundamental concepts and theoretical perspectives related to the study of culture and human behavior. Examine cultural differences in the application of individual differences and organizational-level interventions to improve the utilization of human capital and organizational effectiveness; understand the theory and scope of cross-cultural industrial and organizational research.

Credits

3

Child And Adolescent Psychology Concentration (12 Semester Credits)

Course Description

This course will examine the psychological and cognitive development from infancy to adolescence. Students will learn about different theoretical perspectives and models of development as well as current issues and themes including biological, cognitive, social and moral aspects of development specific to stages of childhood and adolescence.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course will focus on introducing the classification, diagnosis, and current treatment approaches for psychological disorders of childhood and adolescents. Students will learn about the differences between disorders of childhood and adolescence and those of adulthood as well as the etiology of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course examines atypical development of children and adolescents, including those with disabilities as well as those considered gifted and talented. Research on environmental, biological, and cognitive influences on development, as well as considerations for culturally and linguistically diverse children are explored. In addition to identifying the continuum of exceptional children, best practices for interventions and services for home, school, and transition to adulthood are included. Legal and ethical considerations are also considered.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course will focus on the impact of society on children and adolescents. Special topics include but are not limited to social media, technology, violence, community relations, diversity, bullying. Students will also receive an overview on the impact of society within different types of family units.

Credits

3

Forensic Psychology Concentration (12 Semester Credits)

Course Description

This course examines the interaction of psychology and the legal system including the topics of insanity, eyewitness testimony, police interrogation, lie detection, offender rehabilitation, and criminal profiling, and various key experiments in the field of forensic psychology.

Credits

3

Course Description

Examine the foundations of applied social psychology; explore how social psychological theory and research inform the analysis of social issues and social problems, such as the applications of social psychology to education, business and industry, environmental problems, interpersonal and intergroup relations, health, communication, judicial and political systems.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course will focus on the psychological aspects of criminal behavior. The following topics will be explored: the concept of psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder, substance abuse and addiction, types of offenders including juvenile offenders, sex offenders, white collar criminals and female offenders.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course focuses on the application of psychology and psychological research to legal issues at both societal and individual levels. Topics that will be explored include competency to stand trial, insanity defenses, psychology and socialization of police officers, mental health courts, and jury decision making.

Credits

3

Overall Summary of Credits Needed for BA in Psychology Program (Human Services Concentration)

  1. General Education (45 credits)
  2. Core Requirements (30 credits, includes one 3 credit Capstone)
  3. Electives (30 credits)
  4. Concentration (15 credits)

Elective Courses (30 Semester Credits)

Course Description

This course will provide a systemic perspective on Family Violence (FV) and Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) (IPV is formerly and is still referred to as domestic violence). Included in the course is an overview of associated theories and research FV and IPV, various types of abuse, the legal systems response, assessment and intervention techniques and community support services for batterer intervention programs. Special topics will also include socioeconomic status, gender and religion relevant to domestic violence.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course introduces victim advocacy and victimization in the United States relative to social work. Students examine the impact of crime from the victims’ perspective. Special emphasis in the course addresses interventions for victims as well as victim’s rights and services. Students engage victim advocacy topics in both current events and local resources.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course provides an introductory examination of Youth at Risk in the United States. Students explore the physical, psychological, social and cultural dimensions of youths at risk. The course includes topics in diversity, socio-cultural contexts, and social work interventions pertinent to at risk youth populations. Students assess behavioral, emotional, and situational problems facing youth in our society today.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course in human diversity provides students with a framework for understanding race, class, and gender, along with ethnicity, sexual orientation, and privilege. Students are taught to develop critical thinking skills, engage in culturally sensitive practice, and advocate for social justice.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course focuses on child protective services social workers role to ensure the safety and well-being of children living in households where abuse or neglect may be taking place. These social workers may provide counseling to families where poor parenting practices are endangering children. They may identify resources for the troubled families. In some cases, child protective services workers may remove endangered children and arrange adoptions or find foster care for them.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course uses the life-span developmental approach to developmental psychology, including prenatal life development. Gain perspective on biological, physical, cognitive, emotional, linguistic, socio-cultural and spiritual changes across the life span, from prenatal and birth through the major stages of childhood, adolescence and adulthood. The course examines fundamental theories, perspectives and critical thoughts about historical and current arguments in the field.

Credits

3

Course Description

Social Psychology is the study of the relationship between the individual and society. This course covers the theory and method in social psychology, impression formation, social cognition, attitude change, social influence, group processes, and applications of social psychology.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course surveys classic and current theories of personality that represent several of the major perspectives in psychology (e.g., psychoanalytic, biological, developmental, behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, socio-cultural), highlighting the contributions of each theory to personality description, assessment, research, therapy, and application.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course deals with examination of the experimental investigation of complex cognitive processes, including the storage and retrieval of information, concept formation, reasoning, problem-solving and decision making.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course provides a comprehensive study of the various forms of mental illness and maladjustment.

Credits

3

Course Description

The course provides an introduction to the science and practice of clinical and counseling psychology from integrated perspectives. History, major theories, and scientific underpinnings are covered, as well as current developments in practice and research. Major topics include research design, theoretical models, diagnostic and assessment methods, psychotherapeutic interventions, treatment effectiveness, specialization, and training.

Credits

3

Human Services Concentration (15 Semester Credits)

Course Description

This course examines social policies and interventions that address child abuse including neglect and abandonment. Students explore child abuse relative to historical, legal, policy, treatment and prevention. Special topics include attachment, separation, and the long-term effects of abuse on the developing child and the associated risk factors such as substance abuse, mental illness, and domestic violence.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course provides an overview of the social worker’s role with service members, veterans and their families. Students explore services and resources in a variety of settings to include community, government, education, health and mental health. Special topics include military culture, educating stakeholders, advocacy through the social worker’s knowledge of legislative, regulatory, and other associated policies that ensure optimal care for the military population.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course introduces students to international social work and the theoretical underpinnings for social work practice in contemporary settings. Students examine the history, environment, culture, socioeconomic factors and social welfare policies in various geographic locations around the world. Special topics include but are not limited to global poverty, health disparities, treatment of women, population growth and migration. Students will analyze and employ critical thinking skills in a variety of models that demonstrate prevention and or intervention of international social work practice.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course will examine approaches to parenting and development of parenting skills; communication systems study of children and families with various cultural patterns and lifestyles. Topics examined will include: different family structures of communication patterns within the family system context; theoretical implications of techniques used when working with family systems; the importance of cultural awareness when working with families.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course deals with the nature and experience of adult development from the end of adolescence until the end of life. As a psychology course, emphasis will be placed on psychological issues related to personal/ individual issues and differences in aging, as well as on information that has been collected using the scientific method. Topics covered include: kinds of problems that confront people during adulthood; successful and unsuccessful outcomes for adult life; the types of psychological problems that can occur during the aging process; and the role does death play in our lives as we age.

Credits

3

Flexible

TUW presents a flexible course of study by offering the psychology degree online. The degree is designed to maximize the number of transfer credits counted toward the degree, resulting in a shorter completion time.

Drawing on TUW’s exceptional professional practice faculty, students learn firsthand from industry experts who bring relevance to the classroom. Students can immediately apply the lessons learned in the classroom to their current job while preparing to advance their careers to the next level.

TUW Flexible

Program Requirements

The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology requires a total of 120 credit hours for completion.

The time it will take to complete the psychology degree online can vary. The duration of the program depends on several factors, including the number of credits accepted for transfer and whether or not students take time off between courses. Students who enroll full time (12 credits per semester for three semesters each academic year) can complete the degree in three and a half years. Students who enroll part-time (six credits per semester for three semesters each academic year) will complete the program in seven years.

Admission Requirements

Students seeking enrollment in the psychology program must meet one of the following criteria to be considered for admission:

  • Be a high school graduate
  • Have successfully completed the General Educational Development (GED) test
  • Be a transfer student from another accredited college or university in good academic standing