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Online Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership

Become an Expert in Organizational Leadership

Theory (15 Semester Credits)

Course Description

This course provides students an orientation to the Doctorate of Management Program and the scholar-practitioner model. This course is designed to provide an overview of the scholar-practitioner perspective in professional settings. Students will learn about the process of the Scholar-Practitioner model to apply theory to practice in a variety of professional settings that lend to their dissertation in their area of research interest

Credits

3

Course Description

This course is designed to examine foundational leadership theories relevant to management. Students explore the theoretical contributions to contemporary organizational systems, leadership models, and organizational change and associated leadership style and vision. Special emphasis includes topics such as the impact of individual, group, and team leadership on organizational leadership.

Credits

3

Course Description

Throughout this course, students examine strategies in organizational design and redesign utilizing a real-world approach and associated analyses. Special emphasis includes the applicability of hierarchical and organic organization design, contemporary designs, and the impact of leadership decision-making in organizational design or redesign.

Credits

3

Course Description

In this course, students examine theoretical underpinnings associated with the leadership role and influence on building culture within an organization. Special topics include the impact of the leader in shaping organizational culture through topics such as communications, diversity, performance, management across cultures, and organizational learning.

Credits

3

Course Description

Students examine and evaluate contemporary technological, structure, and behavior and technological implications on strategic organizational leadership decisions. Students assess the benefits, risks, and challenges as leaders plan and implement technology in organizations. Special emphasis is on legal and ethical implications of information technology, artificial intelligence, social media platforms and other tools relevant in the contemporary organization.

Credits

3

Applied DMgt Research (15 Semester Credits)

Course Description

In this course, students explore research in organizations to address management challenges supported by theory and application in a variety of settings. Special emphasis is on the research process, fundamental elements of a research proposal and ethics in research in managerial settings. Research methods concepts learned in this course contribute to application of theory and research as well as the students’ dissertation proposal and final defense phases.

Credits

3

Course Description

Students address survey design concepts such as population and sample size, delivery mechanisms, sampling techniques and construction of survey questionnaires. Along with ethical considerations in survey design, students will have an opportunity to identify the type of survey that may be useful in their dissertation research in a selected managerial setting.

Credits

3

Course Description

Students address survey design concepts such as population and sample size, delivery mechanisms, sampling techniques and construction of survey questionnaires. Along with ethical considerations in survey design, students will have an opportunity to identify the type of survey that may be useful in their dissertation research in a selected managerial setting.

Credits

3

Course Description

In this course, students explore the fundamentals of quantitative research methods in managerial studies applicable to a variety of organizational settings. Students are introduced to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to perform basic statistical analyses to describe basic ideas, underlying assumptions, data collection and more that are useful in the field of management studies.

Credits

3

Course Description

In this course, students will build on the topics covered in DMGT 726 and hone their knowledge of quantitative research methods to analyze and address both the challenges and opportunities managers face in organizations. Students use the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) perform analyses to interpret the results of proposed research questions and provide managerial solutions and or implications from those results.

Credits

3

Application of Theory and Research (9 Semester Credits)

Course Description

In this first course in the application of theory to research group of courses, students examine the scholar-practitioner approach through various types of literature. Students begin building their foundational base of managerial references to support their dissertation research, which include peer-reviewed, trade and scholarly publications. Through the literature, students examine real world managerial implications through the theoretical underpinnings posited by scholar-practitioners in the managerial field.

Credits

3

Course Description

This course supplements the framework of DMGT 750 by examining theoretical methods, to include the six (6) key domains of Evidence Based Management (EBM). Students continue to support their dissertation research with lessons learned from publications in evidence-based practices in management that values ethics in determining solutions to a variety of managerial challenges in organizations.

Credits

3

Course Description

The goal of this course is to assist students in identifying a research method used in a professional managerial setting, which may be useful in the students’ dissertation research area of interest. Special emphasis is on students identifying a research theory that supports an initial research topic, research problem or statement and fundamental research question(s).

Credits

3

Proposal Development (12 Semester Credits)

Course Description

In this transitional DMGT course, students are introduced to the fundamental component of the dissertation, which is the conceptual framework. Students draw upon all lessons learned throughout the program to start a preliminary proposal that hones the research topic, underlying theories, fundamental literature and identify proposed research methodology. Students are mentored by the teaching faculty of the course to develop a brief prospectus, which is submitted to the student’s selected dissertation Chair and/or committee members no later than the end of the course. In addition, students are introduced to the Doctoral Management System (DMS), which is used from DMGT 754 through completion of the dissertation.

Credits

3

Course Description

Students will refine their Research topic and gather supportive literature to develop the Dissertation Proposal based on knowledge gained in previous courses, and with the assistance of the dissertation chair and the dissertation committee.

Credits

3

Course Description

Students add to the dissertation proposal by identifying the methods used for the dissertation proposal, and with the assistance of the Chair and committee members.

Credits

3

Course Description

Students prepare and successfully defend the dissertation proposal with the assistance of the Chair and dissertation committee. After final dissertation proposal approval, students complete application to Institutional Review Board (IRB) committee for approval of data collection.

Credits

3

Doctoral Dissertation (15 credits-Minimum Requirement)

Course Description

Student is now in dissertation phase and collecting data upon approval of IRB committee and working on enhanced literature review. Student continues to work with Chair and Committee.

Credits

3

Course Description

Student collecting data and continuing enhanced literature review. Student continues to work with Chair and Committee.

Credits

3

Course Description

Student analyzing data and interpreting results. Student continues to work with Chair and Committee.

Credits

3

Course Description

Individual work of Student with Chair and Committee
Student compiling completed dissertation and submitting drafts to Chair and Committee.

Credits

3

Course Description

Students complete work on their Dissertation, prepare and successfully defend the Doctoral Dissertation.

Credits

3

Tuition Information

TUW’s tuition for the Doctorate of Management is $700 per semester credit unit.

Your employer may offer a tuition assistance program so speak with your human resource representative to find out if financial support is available to you. A TUW Tuition Assistance Counselor is available to you in order to determine your eligibility for financial aid and other tuition assistance programs.

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Program Requirements

The program includes several steps. The first steps are courses in theory, research and putting theory to practice. Upon completion of the required courses, the student begins the phase of pre-Dissertation (Proposal) and Dissertation. Each student will work with a faculty dissertation chair  and committee in completion of the proposal and dissertation phase. To personalize their academic journey for greater outcomes, students will chose a topic to help them focus their research activities and allow for skill development that helps conduct applied research resulting in real-world solutions.

For additional information , please visit the TUW Catalog.

Admission Requirements

Students seeking to enroll in Touro University Worldwide’s Doctor of Management program must meet the following criteria to be considered for admission:

  1. Have earned a Master’s degree from an accredited institution. If the degree was awarded oversees, it must be from an institution that is approved by the Ministry of Education.
  2. Cumulative GPA of 3.4 in the accredited Master’s Program

Students, who meet the above criteria, will be required to complete the following steps in order to be admitted and enrolled at TUW:

  1. Submit an application to the University.
  2. Submit official transcripts from all institutions attended. Transcripts must come directly from the issuing institutions. Students who completed college coursework outside the United States must have their transcripts translated and evaluated. (See Foreign Credit for additional information.)
  3. Submit two letters of recommendation: one from someone familiar with the prospective student’s academic work; and a professional reference from someone who has supervised the prospective student in a work environment (preferably the current supervisor, excluding family members ).
  4. Submit a Doctoral Entrance Essay:
    The entrance essay is an essential part of the Doctoral Program and serves as the initial component of the student’s research portfolio.
    The entrance essay takes the form of a narrative presenting candidates’ biography, career plan, and goals in pursuing the doctorate at Touro University Worldwide.

The Doctoral Admissions Committee will evaluate the essay. Committee members seek evidence regarding critical qualities and abilities including:

  • Motivation, maturity of judgment, and creativity;
  • Evidence of a sound personal agenda that includes achievable personal and professional objectives;
  • Awareness of intellectual strengths as well as skills needing development;
  • Awareness of program requirements
  • Proficiency with standard written English including the ability to express concepts and communicate meaning in concise writing

The Doctoral Entrance Essay components should include the following:

  1. Biographical Component
    Earlier learning experiences, both formal and informal, should be described. Characterize in terms of the nature and general outcome prior study, related work experience, and participation in scholarly research (if any).
  2. Career Plan Component
    Explain how a doctoral-level education fits with stated career plan and goals. How will doctoral study, in conjunction with background and interests, further those goals?
  3. Goals in Pursuing the Doctorate
    Briefly discuss why the reasons for enrolling in doctoral study at Touro University Worldwide, including but not limited to:

    1. The reasons for selecting the TUW program rather than another doctoral program;
    2. The particular goals anticipated to be attained through completion of the doctoral curriculum;

Proposed topics being considered for the dissertation.